Monday, 6 April 2015

Tips: Revising For A-Level Exams

Exam period is getting closer and closer by the second and now is the perfect time, if you haven't already, to start revising. I prefer to start as soon as I can so that i'm not left to cram at the last minute but I actually know a few people who prefer to do that. That leads me to my first main point, everyone works differently and if you haven't already found the best ways for you to revise then why not start now. You've probably heard that there are different 'learner styles' such as visual learners or auditory learners, etc, and there are so many online tests that you can take to determine which you are. (I find that this one is a great one!) You kind of have to experiment to find what works best for you, like most things, and try out different things until your happy with what you are doing. I know that this post mainly focuses on revision for A-level exams, but really could be adapted for any level, whether your revising for GCSE's or your university exams. Also, I just wanted to mention that this is a pretty text-heavy post so feel free to skip to the tips that are most relevant to you, and hopefully they can help! I'd love to hear some of your favourite tips for revision, so please let me know in the comments, and now onto the tips...




1. Start early - From looking back at past years, I find this is one of the most important things to do. This year I've started my revision a lot earlier than I did last year and find that already, it's benefitting me. Beginning earlier means that there is no need to rush and to find yourself panicking at the last minute because you don't know everything that could potentially come up on an exam. 

2. Create a plan/revision timetable - I know not everyone tends to stick to a revision timetable, so why not just make a plan of all the things that you need to learn and then tick them off as you progress? I personally like the idea of a revision timetable as it means that everything is organised and keeps me on check with my work load. Revision timetables are so easy to create and don't have to be anything fancy looking, but below is a simple one that I quickly made that could be printed out and used! I like to print out a timetable then fill it out, making sure each subject/exam is colour coded, then pop it on my wall so that I can clearly see what needs to be done! 


3. Exam specifications/topic checklists - Before I start my revision I like to make a copy of the exam specifications so that I won't forget to revise any of the topics that could pop up on my exam. These are so easy to find online, or maybe are even given to you by your teacher. I like to print/write out a copy for every one of my exams and pop it at the front of my folder and use it as a checklist for everything that I need to revise.

4. Get organised - This one is very important for me as I love making sure everything is organised and in it's place. I find that it's a good idea to use a different folder for each subject, or even for each exam that you sitting. I also find colour coding things is helpful and I usually go through a load of post-it notes too. This will probably benefit you more if your a visual learner like I am, but it's worth knowing where everything is so that it's ready for you when you come to revise.

5. Adapt your techniques to fit the subject - I learnt this when sitting my GCSE's. All subjects are different and mean that you'll have to adapt your usual techniques to fit them. For example, I'm currently studying both A-level Maths and English Literature, which are on the complete opposite ends of the spectrum of each other. For Maths, I tend to complete past paper after past paper, whereas for English I use flash cards to help me learn quotes.

6. Take regular breaks - Making sure to including regular breaks when revising is important but that doesn't mean that you should take a break every ten minutes or so. I've read that taking a 10-15 minute break every 45 minutes works best. As well as taking regular breaks, don't forget that it is okay to build some things other things, like going out with your friends, into revision into your timetable. It's okay to use your time to do things other than revising as long as you divide your time fairly.

7. Set up a calm and relaxing environment to revise in - I prefer to revise in my room as it is very light and airy as I find that very relaxing and comfortable to work in, but some people may prefer to go to the library to revise. This is another example of how it's important to find what works for you! For some inspiration you could check out this post!

8. Focus on the topics that are your weakest - I tend to start by looking at everything that needs to be learnt for an exam and then starting with the topic that I am worse at. This means that I can spend more time getting better at it before I start revising the things that I can already do.

I need to congratulate you if you got to the end of this post as it was a pretty hefty one! Haha. I hope that this could have helped some of you who are currently in the process of revising for your exams, and would love to here your tips too!

14 comments:

  1. I'm in the last year of my a levels and revision can be so hard sometimes! These are great tips!
    The Lipstick, The Girl and Her Wardrobe

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    1. I know right! Hope they helped you :)

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  2. This is all very good advice! Luckily since school everything I have studied (including my current degree) doesn't involve any actual exams and I have never been happier about it! Phew!

    Natasha | www.ofthesaints.uk

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    1. Aha, your so lucky that you don't have to do any exams! Thanks for stopping by :)

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  3. Great tips! This is actually the first year since I started school that I've not got exams. Feels so weird to be having a year out and reading these actually makes me even more excited to go back for my masters. All about that nerd life haha xx

    Love and Marmalade

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    1. Thank you! Aha, dw I think i'd be the exact same way x

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  4. Good luck on your exams :) I finished my college degree a year ago and don't miss my exams :P

    ibelieveinrosa.blogspot.com

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    1. Thank you Larissa! :) Aw, I bet!

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  5. I've now graduated uni but these are all such great tips! I always found that working for 45 minutes then taking a 15 minute break was the perfect amount of time and if I tried to force myself to work without breaks my mind would wander and I'd be less productive :) A-Levels really were the hardest thing I ever did, uni was like a walk in the park after that! Best of lucj with your exams xx

    Magpie Jasmine | Zoeva Brush Set Giveaway

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    1. Thank you! I can't seem to work productively either without taking regular breaks, I get too distracted otherwise :)

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  6. These are all such helpful tips. I find if I add a lot of colour to my revision it really helps, along with all the other thing you mentioned too :)

    Emily//Beauty and Lifestyle Blog

    xx

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    1. I'm glad they helped you! Same here actually :)

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  7. this is exactly what i needed! Going to print off that timetable asap! thank you xx
    www.emilyjanewebb.co.uk

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    1. No problem, I'm just glad that it helped :)

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